Selfie-related accidents have lately killed more people worldwide than shark attacks.

Most of the recently deceased would probably wish to be known as killed by a shark instead of a camera. Their self-absorbed friends would say “Yeah, if you’ve got to go, that’s the way to do it.” Since 2014, the most dangerous places to take a selfie are high places or in water with 16 dying from falling off a cliff and 14 drowning. In third place were those who posed next to an oncoming train.

Conde Nast Traveler reported that more people had died during selfie accidents, while less people worldwide were killed in shark attacks including the recent death of a tourist who fell down the stairs at the Taj Mahal while trying to snap a selfie. While tumbling to his death he was heard to say “Wow, I hope this pic gets a lot of likes.”

The group ‘Friends of Sharks’ didn’t like the comparison. “There’s a difference” said FOS President Gloria Dinardo, “On one hand you’ve got lone wolves shunning all contact with others of their species and then there are the sharks.”

There are also shark encounters contributing to a couple of deaths with people taking selfies with a shark over their shoulder. The risk factor here is similar to jumping off the Empire State building and thinking you’ll land on a pile of mattresses.

There are many creative ways to selfie-destruct.

About 40 people suffered burns while walking across hot coals at a Tony Robbins’ “Unleash the Power Within and the Blisters Without” seminar in Dallas.

An estimated 7,000 people walked across the coals at the event but witnesses said that those that were injured were distracted and either on their cell phones during the walk or taking selfies and other pictures.

Five people ended up being transported to a local hospital and took selfies in the ambulance memorializing the trip forever on Facebook. “That experience was far better than sending a picture of my lunch,” said a burn victim, who ironically didn’t want his name used. “My friends actually saw me getting singed and that’s a first.”

Robbins claims that a coal-walking experience gives people a chance to do something that they normally wouldn’t do or think possible. “When would a person ever think about walking on hot coals for free as opposed to paying big bucks to walk on them” said Robbins. “That’s how I make my living, and that’s pretty cool,” he laughed.