A strong culture isn’t built overnight; but it is the outcome of systemic efforts over a period of time. It is a sure indication that building a winning culture isn’t easy. A company without a winning culture is destined to fall into mediocrity. Culture—the mindsets, values, and behaviours—acts as the glue that holds an organization together and motivates its people toward success.

According to Salt Lake City sales Training, companies with winning cultures are able to execute their strategy in a better manner as their employees tend to focus more on customers and competitors rather than internal politics. Employees become pro-active, think and act like CEOs, and take ownership not just for their own individual tasks but the overall business performance.

Creating a winning culture is a challenge, as it requires modifying habitual behaviours and the way employees think about the organization. However, marketplace threats such as new regulations, new competitors, and new technologies, can present an opportunity to get rid of unproductive practices and inculcate the elements of a good culture. To build a winning team, you need to clearly define the values, join hands with team members and clients that live and share the same values.

Winning cultures can be developed by following these steps:

1.Team members, not employees. In a winning organizational culture, the entire team is geared for the realization of the organizational goals. The team understands how their role affects the final mission success. All team members are aligned, engaged, and focused on achieving organizational goals rather than their individual’s goals.

2.Align the team. For this you need to do a frank assessment of each member: You might face the question like ‘how well does each manager personify the new culture?’ How likely is it that he or she can get rid of old habits and adopt new ones? Often, there might be a need to move a few managers out and bring in new managers to create the necessary enthusiasm and momentum. Providing feedback is necessary to ensure that each team member is modeling the right values for his peers and subordinates.

3.Create an environment of trust. Trust is a key factor for bottom line profitability as it directly affects speed and cost. In an atmosphere of mistrust, speed goes down and cost goes up. Success cannot be achieved if there is mistrust between team members or between the company and its customers. It is a proven fact that trust can be both created and destroyed. It can also be restored and developed into a measurable strategic advantage.

4.Set the right goals and new expectations. In order to drive a business forward, it is necessary to set both attainable goals and unattainable goals. Setting goals and defining the path to success is the way to success. Celebrating the small wins is important but focus on realizing the tougher goals. You should get out of your comfort zones and strive hard to create phenomenal results and then, seemingly unattainable goals will be just another simple win.

5.Focus on results and build accountability. A winning culture is about learning from mistakes, measuring performance, and holding every stakeholder accountable. In a winning culture where the right people are doing the right things, people hold themselves accountable. To create a winning culture, set targets for the business and fix accountability for individual managers. Hold weekly and monthly reviews in the backdrop of performance against targets and pay close attention to problem areas. While communicating these expectations, you need to focus on attaining milestones and on how each team and units can contribute to achieving results.

To maintain the tempo among employees, you must take care to develop consistent and constant communication about the end goals and the essential behaviour patterns.

At the same time, creating appropriate incentives program is important as people are excited about the future and wants to be rewarded for making progress toward it.

In a nutshell, you can have a good strategy in place, but if appropriate culture and the enabling system are lagging, the culture of the organization will defeat the strategy.